I have met and heard the tragic stories of many parents. PA is a function, by and large, of a custodial ex-partner, although some alienation can start while the couple is still together.

This blog is a story of experiences and observations of dysfunctional Family Law (FLAW), an arena pitting parent against parent, with children as the prize. Due to the gender bias in Family Law, that I have observed, this Blog has evolved from a focus solely on PA to one of the broader Family/Children's Rights area and the impact of Feminist mythology on Canadian Jurisprudence and the Divorce Industry.

Monday, May 12, 2014

Another myth shattered, originally created in Australia, about dads and children



Lifting Blanket Restrictions

Posted: Updated: 

Huffington Post blog.
"Big changes are afoot Down Under. And these presage changes in the U.S. and Europe as well. For the past few years, a research report issued by the office of the Australian Attorney General, with statements of its lead author, has exerted a disproportionate impact on the lives of young children whose parents are separated. Bucking the trend to keep both parents regularly involved with their children whether or not the parents live together, Australia's guidelines, widely adopted in the U.S., have discouraged allowing young children to spend overnights with both parents after separation. In most cases such "blanket restrictions" mean that mothers do all the caregiving at night.
But all this is changing. Practically overnight. Australian professionals are shredding their guidelines in the light of two recent papers exposing the flawed science behind denying young children the pleasure of their dads' bedtime stories. A balanced view of the research data supports common sense. If young children can take naps during the day under their fathers' watchful eyes, they can sleep at night in their fathers' homes. If young children can be apart from their working mothers all day long, they shouldn't be deprived of quality time with their dads during the night.
Strong parent-child bonds begin at birth -- for mothers and for fathers. Caring for children at night and being there in the morning is part of the process of developing a solid relationship..."

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